The TUB – Episode 3 – Will McGill

Episode 3 is here! We talk about the NJASA Spring Conference, go over some fan mail, and talk to NJ educator & author Brian Costello about the adventures of Will McGill.

This podcast is available on iTunes, Google Play, Sticher, and other platforms. You cna also click below to listen:

Episode 3

Take It All!

This past Saturday, I had a garage sale. And, like every garage sale you’ve seen, I had junk. Lots of it. Add to the mix that I have twins, so two of every toy, clothes, and every baby gadget known to man. After weeks of gathering it all together, I placed it all in the driveway and went in with the mentality of “take it all”. As long as you take it and give me my two garages & shed back, I’ll make any deal that you want. After placing all of the stuff out, I could not believe all of the stuff I acquired over the past couple of years; most of it I did not even remember I even had.

I didn’t price anything. I didn’t set high expectations of making tons of cash either. I had one goal and one goal only: expunge. Whatever wasn’t was going to get donated; the cash I made goes right to our feeding kid fund (I should really just buy a cow at this point; I buy 4 gallons of milk a week!).

After 4 hours, and subpar weather, I was actually impressed with how much I got rid of. What was “junk” to me was treasure to others. Some purchases were for those in need; others were those looking to flip some furniture; some were collectors, and some were for sheer fun. Every person had a different background. All had one common goal: to acquire new items. 

My favorite person of the day was a gentleman who was just poking around and he came across one of my old work briefcases. The bag retailed for about $400.00; I asked 5 bucks for it. He was ecstatic. He said he was looking for something just like this to put his books in for his night class. He also wanted some new ties for some upcoming interviews; he found a boatload of them as well. His infectious smile combined with what his intentions were enough for me.

So, how does this fit into education?

It’s the time of year where we are about to end the school year. Over the year (or years), we have collected stuff; either things we have used or things we think we will use. It’s time to purge. Don’t remember that you had it? Get rid of it. Switching grades? Get rid of it. Don’t know what it is because you “inherited” items from a retired teacher? Toss it. 

Keeping some of this stuff is cumbersome and could even be dangerous. I had a purge in one of my districts a few years back; they tossed 3 TONS of stuff in 4 days; everything from encyclopedias from the 70s to textbooks that were beyond outdated. I remember another time when a science teacher retired and we had to call a hazmat company in to get rid of the jars of formaldehyde and his secret stash of chemicals! 

Are you retiring? Have a garage sale of your own; offer stuff to your colleagues. What ever isn’t taken, throw it out. No, not textbooks or school issued equipment; all of the stuff you collected. Don’t just leave it for the next person to toss. We as educators are all hoarders by trade; let the next person start fresh and acquire their own.

And please, whatever you do, don’t just take free stuff just to take it. If you have 100 rolls of masking tape, you don’t need 101. 

I hope everyone has a great end of their school year. You worked hard; now go relax! And relaxing does not mean hitting up garage sales to buy more stuff for your classroom! 

GO SMALL!

I have shared blog posts from Dave Burgess with you before, but this post is rather important.  Sometimes, changing the littlest thing will bring the biggest result. Read below on how to do it in a school. The original post can be found here: http://daveburgess.com/go-small/ )


Go BIG! Take a leap! Shoot for the moon! Jump in with both feet!

We hear this type of advice all the time, and quite frankly, I’m often somebody who gives it. It can be a motivational and inspirational message for some (hopefully!), and it may be just what they need to hear to make major breakthroughs in their lives and career.

For others, it is perhaps overwhelming.

It’s easy to look at all the amazing and innovative developments in education that have taken place over the last few years and to get a major case of “analysis paralysis.” Where do I start? What do I tackle first? How can I make all of these changes all at once? How can I possibly learn everything I need to know to do this? The year has already started, so how can I change course mid-stream? What if students flounder under all this new freedom and autonomy? Am I qualified to lead my students in this new direction?

The struggle is real! I get it…I really do. We see rockstar teachers on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and presenting at conferences who have created UNBELIEVABLY empowering classes for their students, and it is easy to feel as if what we are doing is less than adequate. It’s hard to live up to the Pinterest boards and still keep some sort of balance and sanity. How did they get this awesome?

The answer may surprise you, because they often fail to share the most critical part of the journey. The struggle. These classrooms are the product of what is usually a continuous search for new and better, for a mindset of being willing to make small shifts and adjustments in order to test out and experiment with innovative new practices. You are just looking at the end result and feeling overwhelmed but not seeing that each step along the way, when broken down, is very approachable. All of this stuff is doable!

Makeover shows are wildly popular because they show the before and after…PLUS  the journey to transformation. It is in that journey where the real fun and adventure lie. That’s the part that pulls us in. If only a teacher who has traveled this path of the classroom and pedagogical transformation would share the whole story and break it down and just be fully transparent…

It has happened!

Joy Kirr is an unbelievably amazing 7th-grade teacher from Illinois who has been prolifically sharing her ideas and resources for YEARS! Many people who have wanted to jump into the Genius Hour world, for example, have successfully done so using her curated resources. She has truly empowered her students and has designed a learning environment that is not only highly successful…it is flat-out inspirational to behold.

She is that rock-star teacher we were talking about earlier…except that wasn’t always the case. It was a process of making many very small and gradual shifts, all totally doable, over a period of time. We have convinced Joy to swing open the doors of her classroom…the doors of her career…and openly share these shifts and how they have changed her as an educator and, more importantly, changed the class experience for her kids. We have just released her long-awaited book project, Shift This: How to Implement Gradual Changes for MASSIVE Impact In Your Classroom. This is powerful stuff! Classroom set-up and environment, grading practices, homework, class work, student-directed learning, Genius Hour…it ‘s all here. You will be fascinated by her journey and also inspired to take your own.

You can check out Shift This on Amazon (34% off!) here:
https://goo.gl/B59V3Y

Or Barnes & Noble (34% off!) here:
https://goo.gl/gGmV23

When educators who are connected to Joy on social media found out this project was happening, the response was almost universal. “Yes! I want that! She has helped me many times and deserves more recognition for how long she has selflessly served the community.” I hope you will support this new project.  Follow Joy if you aren’t already and tap into the #ShiftThis hashtag on Twitter to continue the discussion.


 

It’s Not You, It’s me

My kids are 27 months (you can tell they are young because I am still describing them in months) and I still consider myself to be a ‘new’ parent. This is a great read. Check it out!

OK, I picked the blog title largely to share one of my favourite Seinfeld clips:

The title has a little more meaning than that.  In recent weeks, I have had a number of people share this quote with me that has gone viral on social media:

This quote really has me thinking.  I am not sure.  I get this is the popular opinion.  We are quick to want to pile-on that parents today have lowered their expectations and increased the enabling of their children.   These kinds of issues are not simple.  Yes, adults have changed, but so has the world around us.  We need to be careful not to romanticize the return to a past that had its share of challenges and deficiencies.

There is no shortage of parenting books out there with advice for how adults should act with their children.  Last week we had Dr. Shimi Kang

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To the Library!

In the world where we have scads of information at our fingertips, why are libraries still amazing? Because they evolve as we do. Well…some of them. If you’ve never come to appreciate your library, or you have a sucky one, I’m sorry. The power and resourcefulness of a quality library is priceless.

I was fortunate to have a superb library growing up. We had a wonderful children’s section, where we could even take out puppets and pop-up books. There was an ample variety of music, a great research section, and we even had an art gallery–always a quiet place to study, to jump into a great book, or even become engulfed in current events.

When deciding to move, one of the biggest factors for me was the library. As our times have evolved, so have most libraries, whether it offers videos, music, and now, in some places, even tools for our homes. Always offering community programming, the library is still the focal point of many in town. It should be the second biggest gem, schools being first.

I’ve worked in towns where there wasn’t a library and was dumbfounded. (Just for the record, when I moved to South Jersey, I had never heard of an all-volunteer fire department either). I’ve also seen libraries the size of my office, and they were amazing. Size doesn’t matter; what they’re offering does.

Recently I have been working with several districts to pair them up with local libraries to partake in cross-venture activities. In one location, the library was shut down due to poor attendance. We are going to open the school one day a week from 4 – 8, so that the community can come in for a variety of opportunities including the use of wifi, computer labs, and, yes, check out books. Another district is planning a weekly potluck dinner with each grade level taking a week over the summer to host. The coolest concept I have seen being planned is bi-weekly movie nights with “movies under the stars” featuring summer book club reads. How cool is that? I can’t wait to hear about the results.

In 2017, the library is still relevant. It’s still a place where learners of all ages can go and engage in a variety of activities. Don’t forget this as we all start going into summer mode. Check out a good book or enjoy a movie under the stars,  video game, craft night, potluck dinner, or perhaps some light banter. It’s what the library is all about!

The TUB podcast – epsiode 2 is here!

Screen Shot 2017-04-30 at 20.48.49.pngI know, it’s about 1.5 months overdue.  I can blame kids, technology, or life.  I’ll go with all three. Episode 2 features the awesomeness of Dr. Brad Gustafson and Renegade Leadership.  Learn about everything from principal baseball trading cards to AR basics. Thanks for your patience. Enjoy!

https://goo.gl/i3Mwqm